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Artificial intelligence

The future of mobile AI

New approaches to on-device and cloud-based AI technologies are transforming everyday experiences.

October 7, 2020

Content sponsored byQualcomm Technologies

Artificial intelligence (AI) continues to expand to power everything from security and facial recognition software to autonomous vehicles and mobile apps.

In “Women leading the future of mobile AI,” a video series sponsored by Qualcomm Technologies, MIT Technology Review CEO Elizabeth Bramson-Boudreau explores the latest AI advances on software tools, mobile platforms, and algorithmic advancements with five women experts, all determined to make AI performance and power efficiency a reality.

Also in this content collection, get help untangling some of AI’s newest, and knottiest, concepts. For example, distributed intelligence—that is, AI spread across channels to power applications such as real-time language translation. Learn about ways to develop innovative applications that overhaul the manufacturing and retail landscape—and get the latest research and insights on machine learning, smart cameras, and edge computing.

View the content hub.

This content was paid for by an advertiser. It was not produced by MIT Technology Review’s editorial staff.

Deep Dive

Artificial intelligence

A Roomba recorded a woman on the toilet. How did screenshots end up on Facebook?

Robot vacuum companies say your images are safe, but a sprawling global supply chain for data from our devices creates risk.

The viral AI avatar app Lensa undressed me—without my consent

My avatars were cartoonishly pornified, while my male colleagues got to be astronauts, explorers, and inventors.

Roomba testers feel misled after intimate images ended up on Facebook

An MIT Technology Review investigation recently revealed how images of a minor and a tester on the toilet ended up on social media. iRobot said it had consent to collect this kind of data from inside homes—but participants say otherwise.

How to spot AI-generated text

The internet is increasingly awash with text written by AI software. We need new tools to detect it.

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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