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Humans and technology

Five forces that will shape the future

These are the big trends of the coming decades that need to be considered for any new technologies to be successful.
February 26, 2020

 

US wealth gap

Since 2007 the bottom 50% has had zero or negative wealth (i.e., debt).

1980 

  • Top 10% of people: 65% of wealth
  • Middle 40% of people: 34% of wealth
  • Bottom 50% of people: .01% of wealth

2014

  • Top 10% of people: 73% of wealth
  • Middle 40% of people: 27% of wealth

Source: World Inequality Database (2018)


Data explosion

We’re going to need better storage, processing, and privacy.

bar chart

Source: IDC Research, The Digitization of the World. From Edge to Core. (2018)


Rise in average global temperatures

As surface temperatures increase, so will sea levels, extreme storms, and habitat disruption.

thermometer showing temperature rise

Source: NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, Climate at a Glance (2020)


Language extinction

From 1950 to 2010, 230 languages went extinct. Today, a third of the world’s languages have fewer than 1,000 speakers left.

Source: UNESCO World Language Atlas (2010); Ethnologue: Languages of the World (2019)


An older population

Today, 9% of the global population is over 65. That’s going to grow in the next decades, redefining work, health care, and our economy.

Source: United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2019). 

Deep Dive

Humans and technology

seeing is believing concept
seeing is believing concept

Our brains exist in a state of “controlled hallucination”

Three new books lay bare the weirdness of how our brains process the world around us.

mdma
mdma

“I understand what joy is now”: An MDMA trial participant tells his story

One patient in a pioneering trial describes his “life-changing” experience with the psychoactive drug.

gif of amazon astro robot turning around and winking
gif of amazon astro robot turning around and winking

Amazon’s Astro robot is stupid. You’ll still fall in love with it.

From Jibo to Aibo, humans have a long track record of falling for their robots. Except this one’s sold by Amazon.

smart rayban glasses with camera eyes
smart rayban glasses with camera eyes

Why Facebook is using Ray-Ban to stake a claim on our faces

To build the metaverse, Facebook needs us to get used to smart glasses.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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