Skip to Content
Computing

MySpace has lost all the music uploaded during its first 12 years

March 19, 2019

The company’s data protection officer blamed it on a server migration, and said it had lost over 50 million songs from 14 million artists.

A while coming: All music on MySpace (aw, remember?) from 2015 and earlier stopped working about a year ago. Originally, the company said it was working on the issue, but it has been forced to admit all the data has been lost (no, it didn’t have any backups).

A niche issue: Okay, most people don’t keep their only copy of a particular record on MySpace. But the fact that so much material can be lost in one fell swoop is a reminder that the internet is not an archive. If you don’t have a physical backup, files can be lost, regardless of how unlikely that might feel.

Save Google +: Sites (and history) are disappearing from the internet all the time. Earlier this month two archivist groups, the Internet Archive and the Archive Team, said they were racing to preserve all the public posts on Google + before they are lost forever. Google’s failed social network is due to start deleting data in April.

Sign up here to our daily newsletter The Download to get your dose of the latest must-read news from the world of emerging tech. 

Deep Dive

Computing

A chip design that changes everything: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2023

Computer chip designs are expensive and hard to license. That’s all about to change thanks to the popular open standard known as RISC-V.

Modern data architectures fuel innovation

More diverse data estates require a new strategy—and the infrastructure to support it.

Chinese chips will keep powering your everyday life

The war over advanced semiconductor technology continues, but China will likely take a more important role in manufacturing legacy chips for common devices.

The computer scientist who hunts for costly bugs in crypto code

Programming errors on the blockchain can mean $100 million lost in the blink of an eye. Ronghui Gu and his company CertiK are trying to help.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.