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Climate change

China is installing a bewildering, and potentially troublesome, amount of solar capacity

It added almost 10 gigawatts of photovoltaic generation to its grid in the first three months of this year—allow us to provide a little context about how huge that is.

The news: PV Magazine reports that China installed 9.65 gigawatts of solar capacity in the first quarter of 2018. That’s up from around seven gigawatts in the same period during 2016 and 2017.

In context: Peter Gleick, a well-known scientist who works on climate issues at the Pacific Institute in Oakland, California, put those numbers into perspective on Twitter. “This is the power equivalent of 10 giant nuclear plants brought on line in three months,” he explained.

Why it matters: Frankly, it’s an astonishing quantity of solar power provision, and it outstrips predictions of what China was expected to add to its grid in the period by as much as two gigawatts. That reaffirms the nation’s commitment to clean energy—though we shouldn't, perhaps, be surprised, given its track record for building out photovoltaics.

But: As Bloomberg New Energy Finance pointed out last year, there can be too much of a good thing. China has recently found itself struggling with oversupply of solar power. That was expected to become less of a problem, as new installations were forecast to slow down and the grid was expected to be beefed up to support the new capacity. That doesn’t appear to be quite what’s happening.

Deep Dive

Climate change

This CRISPR pioneer wants to capture more carbon with crops

New research at Jennifer Doudna's institute aims to create faster-growing, carbon-hungry plants using the gene-editing tool.

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giant kelp underwater

Running Tide is facing scientist departures and growing concerns over seaweed sinking for carbon removal

The venture-backed startup believes kelp could be a powerful tool to combat climate change. But some scientists fear the ecological risks on large scales.

biomass with Charm mobile unit in background
biomass with Charm mobile unit in background

Inside Charm Industrial’s big bet on corn stalks for carbon removal

The startup used plant matter and bio-oil to sequester thousands of tons of carbon. The question now is how reliable, scalable, and economical this approach will prove.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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