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Climate change

Climate change will cause huge internal migration around the world

The World Bank says that 140 million people could be forced to relocate to another part of their country by 2050 as a result of rising temperatures.

The problem: Global warming will cause localized heat waves. Two new studies in Nature Climate Change this week outline how America and Russia will be hit by such effects, for instance.

The news: Rising temperatures will force people to flee some areas. The World Bank predicts that 86 million people in sub-Saharan Africa, 40 million in South Asia, and 17 million in Latin America will have to move in order to survive.

Why it matters: It could cause huge economic and social disruption, especially in poor countries that are least able to deal with huge population movements. The World Bank urges such nations to focus attention on planning for greater internal migration, and it encourages all nations to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Deep Dive

Climate change

This CRISPR pioneer wants to capture more carbon with crops

New research at Jennifer Doudna's institute aims to create faster-growing, carbon-hungry plants using the gene-editing tool.

giant kelp underwater
giant kelp underwater

Running Tide is facing scientist departures and growing concerns over seaweed sinking for carbon removal

The venture-backed startup believes kelp could be a powerful tool to combat climate change. But some scientists fear the ecological risks on large scales.

biomass with Charm mobile unit in background
biomass with Charm mobile unit in background

Inside Charm Industrial’s big bet on corn stalks for carbon removal

The startup used plant matter and bio-oil to sequester thousands of tons of carbon. The question now is how reliable, scalable, and economical this approach will prove.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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