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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week ending October 17, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting and important articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
October 16, 2015
    1. A Tale of Do-It-Yourself Gene Therapy
      An American biotech CEO claims she is the first to undergo gene therapy to reverse aging. Judge for yourself.
    2. Microsoft Researchers Are Working on Multi-Person Virtual Reality
      Researchers in Jaron Lanier’s lab at Microsoft are exploring ways for people to share the experience of mixed reality.
    3. Lyft’s Search for a New Mode of Transport
      How Uber’s archenemy plans to make the world a better place by building a kind of public transit system from private cars.
    4. How Your Smartphone Can Detect Bipolar Disorder
      The sensors in smartphones can accurately detect the changes in mood that are indicative of bipolar disorder, according to a new study. That could lead to faster treatment and better outcomes for sufferers.
    5. Advanced Nuclear Industry to Regulators: Give Us a Chance
      Entrepreneurs argue that reactor technology innovation is limited by regulatory barriers.
    6. An Algorithm Helps Robots Fall Safely
      Researchers at Georgia Tech have developed an algorithm to help humanoid robots hit the ground without breaking themselves.
    7. 1366 Bets on Silicon Wafer Innovation with New Solar Plant
      New method for making silicon wafers enables 1366 Technologies to survive and expand.
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