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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending September 6, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Google Launches Effort to Build Its Own Quantum Computer
    Google’s crack at a quantum computer is a bid to change computing forever.
  2. Fingerprinting Infants Helps Track Vaccinations in Developing Countries
    Biometrics researchers are using off-the-shelf fingerprint sensors and new software to track vaccination records of young children in Africa.
  3. Hackers Are Homing in on Hospitals
    Computer criminals are increasingly capturing valuable information stored on hospital computer networks.
  4. A Path to Better Smartphone Cameras
    A Canadian startup turns to software to improve the quality and reduce the size of smartphone cameras.
  5. On the Horns of the GMO Dilemma
    Can genome-editing technology revive the idea of genetically modified livestock?
  6. Controlled Crystals Make a New Solar Material Practical
    A new kind of low-cost, high efficiency solar cell emerges thanks to crystals known as perovskites.
  7. A Dating Site for Algorithms
    A startup called Algorithmia wants to connect underused algorithms with those who want to make sense of data.
  8. <

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still from Embodied Intelligence video
still from Embodied Intelligence video

These weird virtual creatures evolve their bodies to solve problems

They show how intelligence and body plans are closely linked—and could unlock AI for robots.

pig kidney transplant surgery
pig kidney transplant surgery

Surgeons have successfully tested a pig’s kidney in a human patient

The test, in a brain-dead patient, was very short but represents a milestone in the long quest to use animal organs in human transplants.

conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned
conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned

A horrifying new AI app swaps women into porn videos with a click

Deepfake researchers have long feared the day this would arrive.

thermal image of young woman wearing mask
thermal image of young woman wearing mask

The covid tech that is intimately tied to China’s surveillance state

Heat-sensing cameras and face recognition systems may help fight covid-19—but they also make us complicit in the high-tech oppression of Uyghurs.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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