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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending September 13, 2013)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
September 12, 2013
  1. Technology Is Wiping Out Companies Faster than Ever
    The lifespan of great corporations is getting shorter and shorter.
  2. Academics Launch Fake Social Network to Get an Inside Look at Chinese Censorship
    New research shows that China’s online censorship relies on a competitive market where companies vie to offer the best speech-suppressing technology and services.
  3. Is Samsung’s Galaxy Gear the First Truly Smart Watch?
    Samsung’s new smart watch may be the most polished effort yet—but that doesn’t mean it’ll be a hit.
  4. This Doctor Will Save You Money
    Eric Topol is on a mission to get health care out of the mess it’s in.
  5. Chinese Researchers Make an Invisibility Cloak in 15 Minutes
    Look out for mass-produced invisibility cloaks thanks to an entirely new way of designing and manufacturing them out of materials such as Teflon.
  6. Patients Take Control of Their Health Care Online
    Patients are collaborating for better health—and, just maybe, radically reduced health-care costs.
  7. How Window Glass Is Getting Smarter
    A material that selectively blocks heat and light could finally make it practical to add smart windows to buildings.
  8. <

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