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GM Sets a Price for the Volt

At $41,000, the Volt will be more expensive than a competing electric vehicle from Nissan.
July 27, 2010

GM has announced that it will sell the much-anticipated Chevrolet Volt–an electric car with a gas generator for extending driving range–for $41,000, which is about what people had been expecting. The automaker notes that with a federal tax credit, the actual cost to consumers is $33,500.

GM starts taking orders for the car today. It will be available initially in California, New York, Michigan, Connecticut, Texas, New Jersey and the Washington D.C. area. To buy one, you need to go to a Volt dealer, which you can find at http://www.getmyvolt.com.

The car costs more than the Nissan Leaf, which is also coming out this year. That car will sell for $32,780, or $25,280 after the tax rebate. Both are far more expensive than GMs new, more fuel efficient sedan called the Cruze, which costs $16,995 and is similar in size to the Volt.

With the Cruze, you can get 40 miles per gallon (with the Eco version). The Volt offers 40 miles of electric range with a charge, and 300-miles more with a range-extending gas generator. The Leaf offers 100 miles of gas-free driving range between charges.

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