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Monumental Sculptor

Daniel Chester French created The Minute Man and the Lincoln Memorial statue.

Anyone who has spent spring on campus should be familiar with the Patriots’ Day holiday, Boston’s unofficial beginning of spring and the date of the Boston Marathon since 1897.

The Minute Man
Sculpting The Minute Man, located at the Old North Bridge in Concord, launched the career of alumnus Daniel Chester French, whose later works include iconic statues in Harvard Yard and Washington, D.C.

Historically, Patriots’ Day honors the first military engagements of the American Revolution—the battles of Lexington and Concord, which took place about 10 miles west of Cambridge in 1775. The battle at Concord’s Old North Bridge is commemorated by The Minute Man, a statue in Concord sculpted by former MIT student Daniel Chester French, who would later become famous for sculpting the colossal marble statue of Abraham Lincoln at the Lincoln Memorial.

This story is part of the March/April 2015 Issue of the MIT News Magazine
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French, who lived from 1850 to 1931, spent less than a year at MIT as a student in the late 1860s. According to Chesterwood.org, the website for his historic property in Stockbridge, Massachusetts, he failed physics, algebra, and chemistry before leaving school to work and study with artists John Quincy Adams Ward and William Rimmer.

He was commissioned to execute The Minute Man, his first major monument, in 1873, and the statue was dedicated on the battles’ centenary on April 19, 1875. The seven-foot statue, which depicts a farmer armed with a rifle, launched his career. French spent parts of the next 15 years working in Boston, Washington, D.C., New York, Florence, and Paris.

By the turn of the 20th century, French was a sought-after artist based at Chesterwood, which would be designated a National Historic Landmark in 1965. In 1903, he sculpted Continents, a massive four-work piece at the entrance of the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House in New York City, which depicts four women symbolizing Asia, America, Europe, and Africa.

French produced more than 100 monuments, memorials, and other works during his career, and in 1914, he was selected to sculpt the Lincoln statue. The work took more than three years, and the finished piece, unveiled in 1922, elicited some controversy: some believe that Confederate general Robert E. Lee’s face is carved into Lincoln’s hair.

“What I wanted to convey was the mental and physical strength of the great war President and his confidence in his ability to carry the thing through to a successful finish,” French wrote in 1922.

While his time as a student was unremarkable, French’s Cambridge legacy is permanent. He sculpted the bronze sculpture of John Harvard in Harvard Yard that is a frequent target for MIT hackers, who have added a toilet stall door, a brass rat, and an “Ask Me about My Lobotomy” sign over the years.

Because no photographic evidence exists to indicate what John Harvard actually looked like, an MIT urban legend suggests that French modeled the statue after one of his former MIT classmates.

Perhaps it was a hack, cast in bronze?

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