Intelligent Machines

Touching the Future

Next steps for touch screens.

Research on touch screens didn’t end with the Apple iPhone. Microsoft’s Patrick Baudisch, who’s also a professor at Potsdam University in Germany, has developed a prototype display the size of a credit card, with a touch pad on the back (left). A cursor indicates the position of the user’s finger, but the tiny screen remains unobstructed.

Clear view: The user’s fingers don’t obstruct the screen of this prototype device with a touch pad on the back.

At the opposite extreme, Jeff Han of Perceptive Pixel in New York City is using his large touch screens’ pressure sensitivity to create new graphical interfaces. The screens made a splash during TV coverage of the 2008 election, as news analysts panned across maps by swiping the screens with their fingers. Light travels within an acrylic pane overlying the screens. Touching the pane scatters the light, indicating the point of contact and the pressure exerted. Han has developed software that lets users manipulate on-screen data in three dimensions rather than two, sliding virtual objects under each other by pressing down on them.

This story is part of our January/February 2009 Issue
See the rest of the issue
Subscribe

Three-dimensional manipulation is also the goal of a touch-screen table demonstrated by Yasuaki Kakehi of the Japan Science and Technology Agency and Takeshi Naemura of the University of Tokyo. The surface of the table diffuses light, displaying different scenes at different viewing angles. The researchers think the system could make video collaboration and conferencing more realistic.

Tech Obsessive?
Become an Insider to get the story behind the story — and before anyone else.

Subscribe today

Uh oh–you've read all of your free articles for this month.

Insider Premium
$179.95/yr US PRICE

More from Intelligent Machines

Artificial intelligence and robots are transforming how we work and live.

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe to Insider Premium.
  • Insider Premium {! insider.prices.premium !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Our award winning magazine, unlimited access to our story archive, special discounts to MIT Technology Review Events, and exclusive content.

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly home delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website.

    The Download. Our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation.

    Access to the Magazine archive. Over 24,000 articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips.

    Special Discounts to select partner offerings

    Discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Ad-free web experience

    First Look. Exclusive early access to stories.

    Insider Conversations. Listen in as our editors talk to innovators from around the world.

/
You've read all of your free articles this month. This is your last free article this month. You've read of free articles this month. or  for unlimited online access.