Hello,

We noticed you're browsing in private or incognito mode.

To continue reading this article, please exit incognito mode or log in.

Not an Insider? Subscribe now for unlimited access to online articles.

A View from MIT TR Editors

Brain Hat Helps Control Computer Cursor

U.S. researchers have come one step closer to using brain activity to control computers, according to this BBC News story. The team reported that four subjects – including two partially paralyzed people – moved a cursor on a computer screen…

  • December 7, 2004

U.S. researchers have come one step closer to using brain activity to control computers, according to this BBC News story. The team reported that four subjects – including two partially paralyzed people – moved a cursor on a computer screen with the help of 65 electrodes, which were attached using a special cap.

From the BBC:

“Brain activity produces electrical signals that can be read by electrodes. Complex algorithms then translate those signals into instructions to direct the computer.”

The preliminary research found that the paralyzed subjects were better at learning and manipulating the cursor because their brains were more adaptable, the scientists hypothesized.

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe to Insider Plus.
  • Insider Plus {! insider.prices.plus !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Everything included in Insider Basic, plus the digital magazine, extensive archive, ad-free web experience, and discounts to partner offerings and MIT Technology Review events.

    See details+

    Print + Digital Magazine (6 bi-monthly issues)

    Unlimited online access including all articles, multimedia, and more

    The Download newsletter with top tech stories delivered daily to your inbox

    Technology Review PDF magazine archive, including articles, images, and covers dating back to 1899

    10% Discount to MIT Technology Review events and MIT Press

    Ad-free website experience

/3
You've read of three free articles this month. for unlimited online access. You've read of three free articles this month. for unlimited online access. This is your last free article this month. for unlimited online access. You've read all your free articles this month. for unlimited online access. You've read of three free articles this month. for more, or for unlimited online access. for two more free articles, or for unlimited online access.