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Recent books from the MIT community

March/April 2024

February 28, 2024
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Default: The Landmark Court Battle over Argentina’s $100 Billion Debt Restructuring
By Gregory Makoff ’86
GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2024, $29.95

Wildland Fire Dynamics: Fire Effects and Behavior from a Fluid Dynamics Perspective
Edited by Kevin Speer, SM ’86, PhD ’88, and Scott Goodrick
CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2022, $125

In the Land of the Unreal: Virtual and Other Realities in Los Angeles
By Lisa Messeri ’04, PhD ’11  
DUKE UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2024, $28.95

The Leadership Accelerator: The Playbook for Transitioning into Your New Executive Role
By Ajit Kambil ’85, SM ’89, PhD ’93  
MCGRAW HILL, 2023, $28

ADCS: Spacecraft Attitude Determination and Control
By Mike Paluszek ’76, EAA ’79, SM ’79
ELSEVIER, 2023, $127.50

Code Work: Hacking Across the US/México Techno-Borderlands
By Héctor Beltrán ’07, assistant professor of anthropology
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2023, $26.95

The Fallacy of Composition: Critical Reviews, Conceptual Analyses, and Case Studies
By Maurice A. Finocchiaro ’64
COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS, 2023, $20.50

Fiscal Policy under Low Interest Rates
By Olivier Blanchard, professor of economics emeritus
MIT PRESS, 2023, $40


Send book news to MIT News at MITNews@technologyreview.com or 196 Broadway, 3rd Floor, Cambridge, MA 02139

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