Skip to Content
Profiles in generosity

Tom Davis ’84, SM ’85 & Betsy Davis ’84, MArch ’88

Andover, Massachusetts
September 8, 2020
Thomas Davis ’84, SM ’85 Elizabeth Davis ’84, MArch ’88
Thomas Davis ’84, SM ’85 Elizabeth Davis ’84, MArch ’88
M. Scott Brauer

Many years after meeting in a freshman fencing class, Tom and Betsy (Beliveau) Davis were reacquainted and eventually married. Their shared undergraduate experience led them to establish the Tom and Betsy Davis Scholarship Fund, which has helped two students attend MIT. A bequest plan—developed with the MIT Office of Gift Planning—ensures that the fund will support more students in the future. 

Supporting undergraduates. “We both benefited from the generosity of others, including scholarships,” says Betsy. “The undergraduate years are incredibly formative, and to help somebody else have that experience is really meaningful to us.” Tom agrees, adding, “If we can knock down the financial burden for students, they’ll be more focused on what they came here to do.”

Celebrating the MIT experience. Today, Betsy is associate director of facilities at Phillips Academy Andover and Tom works in supply chain management for a Palo Alto consulting firm. Both have happy memories of MIT. “There were moments in class where the waters parted and you could see truth in its purest form,” says Tom. “But some of the best moments for me happened outside of the classroom.” 

Goals for the future. Tom and Betsy hope others will consider establishing scholarships. “You don’t have to build a building—you can make an impact with annual giving,” says Tom. Betsy adds, “Funding a scholarship feels like an investment in the future for everyone, because the impact students can make with a little bit of assistance from us is incredible.”

Help MIT build a better world. 
For information, contact Amy Goldman
617.253.4082; goldmana@mit.edu
giving.mit.edu/planned-giving

Keep Reading

Most Popular

The Steiner tree problem:  Connect a set of points with line segments of minimum total length.
The Steiner tree problem:  Connect a set of points with line segments of minimum total length.

The 50-year-old problem that eludes theoretical computer science

A solution to P vs NP could unlock countless computational problems—or keep them forever out of reach.

section of Rima Sharp captured by the LRO
section of Rima Sharp captured by the LRO

The moon didn’t die as early as we thought

Samples from China’s lunar lander could change everything we know about the moon’s volcanic record.

conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other
conceptual illustration of a heart with an arrow going in on one side and a cursor coming out on the other

Forget dating apps: Here’s how the net’s newest matchmakers help you find love

Fed up with apps, people looking for romance are finding inspiration on Twitter, TikTok—and even email newsletters.

ASML machine
ASML machine

Inside the machine that saved Moore’s Law

The Dutch firm ASML spent $9 billion and 17 years developing a way to keep making denser computer chips.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.