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Goodbye net neutrality, for now

June 11, 2018

Starting today, US service providers do not have to treat all internet traffic equally.

Some background: In December 2017, the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal rules that prevented internet companies from slowing down service for specific websites or content.  

What happens now: As of today, those rules are officially gone. Companies like Comcast and Verizon can start charging more for certain services. Odds are good that you won’t immediately see a major change in your internet service, as providers are waiting to see how the legislation plays out. At that point, watch for slow changes that service providers may hope will slip by unnoticed.

What happens next: There will likely be protests today as people try to convince House representatives to reinstate the regulations. Some members of Congress are still fighting to overturn the ruling, so there’s hope for a net neutrality return if legislators agree to it.

Read more: FCC chairman Ajit Pai laid out why today’s change is for the best, and our own Martin Giles explained how the demise of net neutrality will harm innovation in America.

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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