Skip to Content
Smart cities

Lawmakers Think You Shouldn’t Drink and Drone

January 4, 2018

Officials in New Jersey are readying to ban use of drones while inebriated. Reuters reports that the bill, already approved by the state senate, will go to vote at the New Jersey Assembly next Monday.

The case against: The fast, spinning rotors on quadcopter drones can be vicious (just ask Enrique Iglesias). “It’s basically like flying a blender,” says aerial cinematographer John Sullivan to Reuters. And dangerous objects are usually best avoided under the influence of alcohol and drugs.

More seriously: The bill also seeks to outlaw other questionable drone practices, such as flying the aircraft above prisons or using them to chase animals.

Turbulent drone policies: Regulations governing drone use are changing fast. The New Jersey bill is part of a broader move: Reuters explains that “at least 38 states are considering restrictions on the devices this legislative year.” Meantime, the Trump administration has introduced policies to encourage drone innovation in the U.S.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

VR is as good as psychedelics at helping people reach transcendence

On key metrics, a VR experience elicited a response indistinguishable from subjects who took medium doses of LSD or magic mushrooms.

This nanoparticle could be the key to a universal covid vaccine

Ending the covid pandemic might well require a vaccine that protects against any new strains. Researchers may have found a strategy that will work.

How do strong muscles keep your brain healthy?

There’s a robust molecular language being spoken between your muscles and your brain.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.