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Profiles in generosity

Malcom B. Strandberg

Cambridge, Massachusetts
April 25, 2017

Physics professor Malcom W.P. “Woody” Strandberg, PhD ’48, a noted expert on microwave physics, spent almost six decades at MIT. When he passed away in 2015, he left a trust for his son, Malcom B. Strandberg, to designate at his discretion. That trust is now benefiting the Institute in the areas of sustainability, service, and STEM education.

“Dad was the inspiration to try to understand nature,” says Strandberg, an engineer and software developer who is passionate about sustainable living and has created a “Tech Village” model for small-scale, high-density green communities. He has directed part of his gift to MIT’s Office of Sustainability and to MIT’s D-Lab, both of which are exploring the development of more sustainable living environments. Humanity should, he says, “have less of a footprint on the world.”

Noting, too, that his father was dedicated to “inspiring children into science, and taking care of the community,” Strandberg is also supporting the MIT Office of Engineering Outreach’s STEM program and sustainability projects at the Priscilla King Gray Public Service Center.

Strandberg says he is excited to be plugged into MIT’s work to promote the health of the planet and is confident that the Institute will be a global leader in innovative approaches to sustainability. “If MIT shows it can make progress in these areas, then hopefully other places will try to do it as well,” he says.

Please consider your own gift to MIT.
For information, contact David Woodruff: 617-253-3990; daw@mit.edu.
Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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