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Profiles in generosity

Ron Rohrer ’60 and Casey Jones

Henderson, Nevada
February 22, 2017

Ron Rohrer ’60 and his wife, Casey Jones, have spent much of their life together pursuing entrepreneurial opportunities and nurturing startups, blending Ron’s engineering background and Casey’s marketing expertise. For this enterprising couple, the hands-on, problem-solving culture of MIT, where Ron earned a degree in electrical engineering, resonates strongly, inspiring them to give to an institution they believe has the power to help shape the future.

Casey and Ron met in the semiconductor industry, Ron’s major focus during a career that alternated between academia and business. Discovering a mutual passion for innovation, they eventually became full-time entrepreneurs, and they have shared the highs and occasional lows of both small and big business.

In establishing both a charitable remainder unitrust and a bequest—both unrestricted—Ron and Casey wanted to plan for their future while supporting solutions to what MIT views as society’s greatest challenges. “We explored other options, but the return on investment on the charitable remainder unitrust has been incredibly impressive over the last 10 years,” says Casey.

They are confident MIT will invest “in initiatives that will have the most positive impact,” notes Ron. “It’s why we think our decision was right for us, our children, and our grandchildren—hopefully changing the world for the better.”

Please consider your own gift to MIT.
For information, contact Amy Goldman:
617.715.2932; goldmana@mit.edu.
Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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