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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week ending November 14, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting and important articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
November 13, 2015
  1. To Study the Brain, a Doctor Puts Himself Under the Knife
    How one of the inventors of brain-computer interfaces ended up getting one himself.
  2. New Material Makes It Easier to Store Lots of Natural Gas
    Synthetic porous materials that flex to take up and release fuel could lead to cheaper natural-gas cars that don’t need cumbersome storage tanks.
  3. White House Strikes a Blow for Advanced Nuclear Reactors
    The Department of Energy will help startups navigate the testing and licensing process—but some nuclear entrepreneurs doubt it will be enough.
  4. Get a Virtual-Reality Punch, Feel Real Impact
    Researchers in Germany have developed technology for an armband that lets you feel impact from virtual interactions.
  5. Robot Makes Sure Stores Don’t Run Out of Doritos
    A shelf-scanning bot called Tally will help make sure everything is in its place in supermarkets and other retail outlets.
  6. Single Artificial Neuron Taught to Recognize Hundreds of Patterns
    Biologists have long puzzled over why neurons have thousands of synapses. Now neuroscientists have shown they are crucial not just for recognizing patterns but for learning the sequence in which they appear.
  7. Using Virtual Reality to Save the White Rhino
    There are four northern white rhinoceroses left in the world. Will a 360-degree documentary help us preserve them?
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