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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending January 3, 2015)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. 2014 in Biomedicine: Rewriting DNA, Decoding the Brain, and a GMO Paradox
    From genetically modified foods to gene therapy, 2014 was a big year for rewriting biology.
  2. Could Passenger Planes Be Tracked More Closely?
    Several technologies allow aircraft to be tracked over the ocean via satellite, but most solutions are costly.
  3. New Form of Memory Could Advance Brain-Inspired Computers
    A new kind of computer memory could help make more capable computer chips that function more like biological brains, say IBM researchers.
  4. 2014 in Computing: Breakthroughs in Artificial Intelligence
    The past year saw progress in developing hardware and software capable of human feats of intelligence.
  5. How Tesla Boosted Its Roadster’s Range by 50 Percent
    An upgrade to the Roadster extends its range and shows how far battery technology has come.
  6. The Top Technology Failures of 2014
    What do the latest technologies to flop, fizzle, and flame out tell us about innovation?
  7. Device Squeezes Cells to Get Drugs In
    A new way to get materials into cells might clear the way for powerful treatments for diseases like cancer and HIV.
  8. <

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computation concept
computation concept

How AI is reinventing what computers are

Three key ways artificial intelligence is changing what it means to compute.

still from Embodied Intelligence video
still from Embodied Intelligence video

These weird virtual creatures evolve their bodies to solve problems

They show how intelligence and body plans are closely linked—and could unlock AI for robots.

conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned
conceptual illustration showing various women&#039;s faces being scanned

A horrifying new AI app swaps women into porn videos with a click

Deepfake researchers have long feared the day this would arrive.

pig kidney transplant surgery
pig kidney transplant surgery

Surgeons have successfully tested a pig’s kidney in a human patient

The test, in a brain-dead patient, was very short but represents a milestone in the long quest to use animal organs in human transplants.

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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