Skip to Content

EmTech: Nest Technologist on the Problem of Remaking “Unloved Devices”

Nest technology vice president Yoky Matsuoka says the smart-thermostat maker has learned the importance of making a device people want to touch.
September 23, 2014

On a plane the other day, Yoky Matsuoka, vice president of technology for Nest Labs, asked a fellow passenger what kind of thermostat he had in his home. He didn’t know, he said, but it was brown, and square.

“I assume if they don’t like it, they don’t use it,” Matsuoka said, relating the encounter at MIT Technology Review’s annual EmTech conference at MIT on Tuesday. On the other hand, she continued, users of Nest’s Internet-connected thermostats are pretty hands-on with the device, literally: they touch it an average of 1.6 times per day.

Nest, which was purchased by Google for $3.2 billion early this year, is probably the most well-known and style-conscious company making connected devices for the home, a swiftly growing segment of the so-called “Internet of things.” The company released its first product in 2011, a slickly designed, Internet-connected thermostat that can be controlled remotely via a smartphone, and can save energy by learning about your habits and adjusting itself accordingly (see “How Nests Control Freaks Reinvented the Thermostat”).

The importance of creating a product that people want to touch is one of several things Matsuoka said Nest has learned as it takes “unloved” products like the thermostat and, more recently, smoke detector, and tries to make them covetable, connected, and capable of saving energy.

Nest discovered it must build products that are clearly improving their lives, she said, but people also have to feel like they’re in charge of the devices.

As of last month, Nest users had saved 2.5 billion kilowatt-hours, but interestingly, not everyone who uses it wants to conserve at all costs: in an early trial of its machine-learning technology, Nest saw that users got upset when the thermostat assumed it would be okay to change the temperature from what the user wanted.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

The miracle molecule that could treat brain injuries and boost your fading memory

Discovered more than a decade ago, a remarkable compound shows promise in treating everything from Alzheimer’s to brain injuries—and it just might improve your cognitive abilities.

wet market selling fish
wet market selling fish

This scientist now believes covid started in Wuhan’s wet market. Here’s why.

How a veteran virologist found fresh evidence to back up the theory that covid jumped from animals to humans in a notorious Chinese market—rather than emerged from a lab leak.

Conceptual illustration showing a file folder with the China flag and various papers flying out of it
Conceptual illustration showing a file folder with the China flag and various papers flying out of it

The US crackdown on Chinese economic espionage is a mess. We have the data to show it.

The US government’s China Initiative sought to protect national security. In the most comprehensive analysis of cases to date, MIT Technology Review reveals how far it has strayed from its goals.

conceptual illustration showing various women's faces being scanned
conceptual illustration showing various women's faces being scanned

A horrifying new AI app swaps women into porn videos with a click

Deepfake researchers have long feared the day this would arrive.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.