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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending July 12, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Neuroscientists Object to Europe’s Human Brain Project
    Critics call emphasis on large-scale computer simulations in EU brain project premature.
  2. Low-Power Color Displays
    Oxford University researchers demonstrate that materials used in DVDs could make color displays that don’t sap power.
  3. A Speech Synthesizer Direct to the Brain
    Recordings from the brain’s surface are giving scientists unprecedented views into how the brain controls speech.
  4. Beijing Wants to Understand Its Smog
    New effort would pinpoint the source, type, and dispersal patterns of smog across Beijing to drive street-level predictions and targeted remediation.
  5. GE Device Measures the Calories on Your Plate
    Low-energy microwaves can tell you the caloric content of food, providing a more accurate estimate of what is on your plate.
  6. How to Clean the Gas and Oil Industries’ Most Contaminated Water
    A new process can cheaply clean extremely briny water coming up from oil wells.
  7. Forget the Shortest Route Across a City; New Algorithm Finds the Most Beautiful
    If you prefer beautiful routes over short ones, GPS mapping algorithms are of little use. But Yahoo researchers have come up with an approach that could change that.
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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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