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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending April 12, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. Going Nuclear: The Global Picture
    Three years after the Fukushima disaster, some countries are pulling back from nuclear power while others grow capacity.
  2. Cheap Solar Power—at Night
    New solar thermal technologies could address solar power’s intermittency problem.
  3. A Less Resource-Intensive Way to Make Ethanol
    Stanford researchers develop a copper catalyst that can efficiently convert carbon monoxide and water to ethanol.
  4. Why Google’s Modular Smartphone Might Actually Succeed
    Google believes open hardware innovation could help it find industries and markets for its software and services.
  5. The Revival of Cancer Immunotherapy
    An old idea for treating cancer is yielding impressive results on cancer patients—and lots of attention from drug companies.
  6. What Should You Do About Heartbleed? Excellent Question.
    An Internet bug had massive potential security implications. But good luck getting information on whether any actual damage was done.
  7. The Underfunded Project Keeping the Web Secure
    A security flaw affecting two-thirds of websites is a reminder that the Web relies on a poorly resourced open-source project.
  8. <

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Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

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