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Seven Must-Read Stories (Week Ending March 14, 2014)

Another chance to catch the most interesting, and important, articles from the previous week on MIT Technology Review.
  1. The Numbers Behind Japan’s Renewed Embrace of Nuclear
    The Fukushima disaster led Japan to shut down nuclear power plants, but three years of rising costs and carbon dioxide emissions are forcing it to reverse course.
  2. A Cheaper Route to Making Chemicals from CO2
    A startup says it has a more efficient process to use carbon dioxide for making valuable chemical feedstocks.
  3. Microbes and Metabolites Fuel an Ambitious Aging Project
    Craig Venter’s new company wants to improve human longevity by creating the world’s largest, most comprehensive database of genetic and physiological information.
  4. From Leaker to Speaker
    Edward Snowden appeared via secure video to motivate developers at SXSW.
  5. Tech Companies Shine Some Light on National Security Requests
    “Transparency reports” reveal insights about the requests made in the name of national security—including information that was previously kept secret.
  6. Entrepreneur Hopes to Use Interference to Improve the Mobile Internet
    WebTV’s creator thinks his forthcoming wireless technology will give us faster, better mobile Internet access.
  7. The $1 Origami Microscope
    A low-cost microscope made from folded paper and a cheap lens could revolutionize education and health care in the developing world.
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