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Want to See What it’s Like to Wear Google Glass?

You can’t wear Google Glass–yet–but you can get a glimpse of what it will look like.

If, like most of us peons, you haven’t gotten a chance to try out Google Glass, there’s now a way to get a sense of what it’s like to take it–and its virtual display–for a spin.

An image taken by tech blog Mashable shows what it’s like to wear Google Glass, up-to-date sports scores and all.

Tech blog Mashable apparently got ahold of the device and figured out how to photograph the images projected through its tiny, transparent, above-eye prism (which appear as a virtual display in front of you) by holding it very close to a smartphone camera lens.

The results, seen here, are quite interesting. Mashable managed to capture a number of different Glass capabilities, including navigating with a map that moves as you move your head, viewing sports scores and photographs, and conducting searches. Overlaid on the wearer’s real-world view, they look surprisingly clear and not nearly as intrusive as I’d expect. Numerous images are overshadowed by a rainbow effect–Mashable says isn’t visible to the Glass wearer, but in its recent Glass review, Engadget noted the appearance of a rainbow effect when moving one’s head rapidly from side to side.

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Illustration by Rose Wong

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