Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Apple Wins Big in Major Patent Trial

The iPhone maker gains the advantage in patent fight with Samsung
August 25, 2012

After only three days of deliberation in a complicated and high-profile trial, a nine-person jury found that Samsung has infringed on six of Apple’s mobile technology and design patents and determined the iPhone maker should be awarded more than $1 billion in damages. 

The verdict appears to be a big victory for Apple and a milestone in ongoing mobile patent skirmishes around the globe. Importantly, the jury declared that all seven of the Apple patents in the case are valid.

What’s not clear yet is how the verdict will impact the broader smartphone and tablet industry, or other manufacturers that use Google’s Android operating system. On Twitter, Gartner analyst Michael Gartenberg wrote, “Larger implications will be for other vendors, who will have to carefully look at their designs post verdict.” 

A few interesting takes on the news, which broke on a sleepy Friday afternoon, come from Wired, All Things D, and USA Today. And for those interested in a complete blow-by-blow, there’s a live blog on The Verge

Keep Reading

Most Popular

Workers disinfect the street outside Shijiazhuang Railway Station
Workers disinfect the street outside Shijiazhuang Railway Station

Why China is still obsessed with disinfecting everything

Most public health bodies dealing with covid have long since moved on from the idea of surface transmission. China’s didn’t—and that helps it control the narrative about the disease’s origins and danger.

crypto winter concept
crypto winter concept

Crypto is weathering a bitter storm. Some still hold on for dear life.

When a cryptocurrency’s value is theoretical, what happens if people quit believing?

individual aging affects covid outcomes concept
individual aging affects covid outcomes concept

Anti-aging drugs are being tested as a way to treat covid

Drugs that rejuvenate our immune systems and make us biologically younger could help protect us from the disease’s worst effects.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.