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When Is an Electric Bike Like a Suitcase?

When it’s the Boxx.
February 3, 2012

This isn’t your grandfather’s electric bike. (Assuming he had one?)

More to the point, it’s not like any other e-bike I’ve seen. In terms of form-factor, the Boxx has more in common with a suitcase, or perhaps even a jumbo SIM card. Were it not for the pair of wheels poking out of the bottom, or the little spindly handlebars on top, it might not strike you as a bike at all. Take a look at Boxx’s site to see what I mean.

The Boxx recently debuted at the Portland Auto Show; the site RedFerret was one of the first to spot it, but PC World has a more thorough report. The Boxx can hit a top speed of 35 mph, not bad, for a speeding suitcase. With an aluminum body, the Boxx can handle someone up to 300 pounds. The thing ain’t cheap, at $3,995. And indeed, if you want to extend the range to 80 miles, you’ll have to pony up an additional $500 for something it calls a “Core 2 modular power system.” If money is no object at all, you can also buy a one-hour charging unit and a three-year warranty.

It seems to me there are two reasons to get the Boxx, as opposed to some of the other e-bikes I’ve covered on this blog. Either you simply find the design too adorable to pass up, or parking and storage space is a serious problem for you at either end of your commute. The best thing about the Boxx, arguably, is its consummate storability: it’s not much more than three feet long, meaning you could tuck it in your cube easily–and maybe treat it as a little conversation piece for the envious coworkers who drop by.

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