Skip to Content
Uncategorized

When Is an Electric Bike Like a Suitcase?

When it’s the Boxx.
February 3, 2012

This isn’t your grandfather’s electric bike. (Assuming he had one?)

More to the point, it’s not like any other e-bike I’ve seen. In terms of form-factor, the Boxx has more in common with a suitcase, or perhaps even a jumbo SIM card. Were it not for the pair of wheels poking out of the bottom, or the little spindly handlebars on top, it might not strike you as a bike at all. Take a look at Boxx’s site to see what I mean.

The Boxx recently debuted at the Portland Auto Show; the site RedFerret was one of the first to spot it, but PC World has a more thorough report. The Boxx can hit a top speed of 35 mph, not bad, for a speeding suitcase. With an aluminum body, the Boxx can handle someone up to 300 pounds. The thing ain’t cheap, at $3,995. And indeed, if you want to extend the range to 80 miles, you’ll have to pony up an additional $500 for something it calls a “Core 2 modular power system.” If money is no object at all, you can also buy a one-hour charging unit and a three-year warranty.

It seems to me there are two reasons to get the Boxx, as opposed to some of the other e-bikes I’ve covered on this blog. Either you simply find the design too adorable to pass up, or parking and storage space is a serious problem for you at either end of your commute. The best thing about the Boxx, arguably, is its consummate storability: it’s not much more than three feet long, meaning you could tuck it in your cube easily–and maybe treat it as a little conversation piece for the envious coworkers who drop by.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Embracing CX in the metaverse

More than just meeting customers where they are, the metaverse offers opportunities to transform customer experience.

Identity protection is key to metaverse innovation

As immersive experiences in the metaverse become more sophisticated, so does the threat landscape.

The modern enterprise imaging and data value chain

For both patients and providers, intelligent, interoperable, and open workflow solutions will make all the difference.

Scientists have created synthetic mouse embryos with developed brains

The stem-cell-derived embryos could shed new light on the earliest stages of human pregnancy.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.