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Energy-Sipping Servers

December 20, 2011

This is the first in a new line of server systems designed to cut the power demand of data centers, which has become a growing problem: last year, by one estimate, American data centers consumed 100 billion kilowatt-­hours of electricity, or about 2 percent of all electricity produced in the United States. The system bundles over 2,800 servers in a single module, using chips based on a processor design originally intended for battery-­conscious mobile devices. Calxeda, which makes the chips, claims that its servers draw five watts when operating and only half a watt when idle, compared with conventional server processors that draw 160 watts when operating and 80 watts when idle.

Product: Redstone Server Development Platform
Cost: N/A
Availability: First half of 2012
Source: www.hp.com
Companies: HP and Calxeda

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