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Let Them Eat Campus

August 23, 2011

At Toast to Tech, the MIT150 finale in Killian Court on June 4, the MIT community was treated to birthday greetings recorded in space, fireworks, champagne, and a 24-foot cake that bore an uncanny resemblance to the MIT campus. Montilio’s Baking Company of Quincy used 420 pounds of sugar, 225 pounds of cake flour, and a whopping 235 pounds of shortening in its edible versions of six iconic campus buildings and Tim the Beaver astride Mass. Ave. bridge traffic, plus a 1,000-cupcake rendition of the Charles River. Together, the cake and cupcakes weighed in at more than 1,000 pounds. More views of the cake are at technologyreview.com/150cake.

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