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Faster Interfaces

April 19, 2011

Apple’s new laptops are the first computers to use Intel’s Thunderbolt interface technology, which is intended to replace Firewire and USB and eliminate the need for a separate port to connect displays. Up to six devices can be daisy-chained to a single Thunderbolt port (identified by a lightning-bolt symbol), with transfer speeds of up to 10 gigabits per second—twice that of USB 3.0 and 20 times that of USB 2.0. The interface works by providing external access to the high-speed bus used inside PCs to connect expansion cards.

Product: 15-inch MacBook Pro
Cost: $1,800
Availability: Now
Source: www.apple.com
Companies: Apple and Intel

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