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Lucille Cesari

Winchester, Massachusetts
December 21, 2010

“Imagine saving for your youngster to go to MIT. The stock market is down, bonds are down, interest rates are down. Savings aren’t worth much. This would be a great time to establish a scholarship,” says Lucille Cesari. That’s why she recently created a scholarship for students in the Schools of Engineering or Science to memorialize her late husband, Bob, who earned a degree in electrical engineering at MIT in 1950.

“I wanted to honor my husband, to preserve his memory, and to make it possible for a bright young student to go to MIT,” she says. “My husband and I discussed the scholarship in 2008 before he died. We wanted to help students, the university, and the country. Today, Bob would be thrilled. I know I am.”

Lucille was a sophomore at Tufts University when she came to MIT to socialize one day. During a game of bridge with a group of students, Bob Cesari looked at her cards over her shoulder and advised her how to play the hand. They were married two years later.

Bob went on to earn a degree from Harvard Law School in 1955, then launched a 50-year career as an intellectual-property lawyer. He practiced at Blair, Buckles, and Cesari in Stamford, Connecticut, and later founded Cesari and McKenna in Boston, where he specialized in patent, trademark, and copyright law, primarily with high-technology clients.

“MIT has always felt like an extended family,” says Lucille, whose sister, brother-in-law, daughter, son-in-law, and grandson also went to the Institute. When she isn’t spending time with her family, she enjoys golf, bowling, and of course, bridge. (“I’m a better player now.”)

“I’m in awe of MIT,” she says. “I never cease to be amazed at what faculty and students are accomplishing. They’re such great thinkers and are on the leading edge of research in every discipline.

“MIT is an incredible place—the best in the world. It’s a pleasure to know that another remarkable MIT student will now be going forth to help keep our nation great.”

For giving information, contact Rob Scott: 617-253-3394; rscott@mit.edu. Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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