Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Broadband growth plummets in 2Q, cable stronger

NEW YORK (AP) _ The number of new high-speed Internet subscribers in the United States fell in the second quarter to the lowest level since a research company began tracking the broadband market seven years ago.

The 20 largest cable and telephone companies added a net 887,000 residential and small-business subscribers in the three months ending June 30, Leichtman Research Group Inc. said Monday. Its tally is based on public reports and estimates.

The number of new customers is half that of the second quarter of 2007.

Bruce Leichtman, president of the firm, said the slowdown mainly results from a drop in new customers at the phone companies, which added just 23 percent of the customers they added in last year’s second quarter.

The largest phone companies, AT&T Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc., have begun to emphasize faster, more expensive services over entry-level DSL.

“They don’t have those bargain-basement offers that they used to have two to three years ago,” Leichtman said. Now, they want “the right subscribers,” the ones who won’t cancel when their one-year promotional rates expire.

Cable companies did much better than phone companies, adding 85 percent as many subscribers as they did a year ago. While the two industries have usually divided new broadband customers evenly between them, 76 percent of the new business went to cable companies in the quarter.

Cable companies now have 35.3 million broadband customers, compared with 29.7 million at the phone companies. AT&T remains the country’s largest Internet service provider, with 14.7 million customers, just ahead of cable company Comcast Corp. with 14.4 million.

Saturation of the market also plays a role in slowing adoption, Leichtman said, but “there’s a lot of growth potential out there” among people who use dial-up or don’t have Internet access at all.

The companies included in Leichtman’s tally account for 94 percent of the U.S. broadband market.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

A Roomba recorded a woman on the toilet. How did screenshots end up on Facebook?

Robot vacuum companies say your images are safe, but a sprawling global supply chain for data from our devices creates risk.

A startup says it’s begun releasing particles into the atmosphere, in an effort to tweak the climate

Make Sunsets is already attempting to earn revenue for geoengineering, a move likely to provoke widespread criticism.

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2023

Every year, we pick the 10 technologies that matter the most right now. We look for advances that will have a big impact on our lives and break down why they matter.

The viral AI avatar app Lensa undressed me—without my consent

My avatars were cartoonishly pornified, while my male colleagues got to be astronauts, explorers, and inventors.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.