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E. Fulton (Bud) Brylawski

Quechee, VT, and Tequesta, FL
August 14, 2007

“I’m very impressed with the advances that are being made in the research and treatment of cancer and the development of drugs and various antiagents to treat it,” says Bud Brylawski, who recently established the E. Fulton Brylawski Fund, a gift annuity that will provide unrestricted funds to MIT’s Center for Cancer Research. “I think we’re making real progress in combating this disease.”

E. Fulton (Bud) Brylawski

Brylawski established a gift annuity, he says, because “I liked the idea of being able to give away so much of my estate while receiving income for life. The annuity also allows me to get a tax deduction and to participate in the giving process while still alive.”

Brylawski earned a bachelor’s from MIT in electrical engineering as a member of the navy V-12 program in 1946. After earning degrees from Harvard Business School and Yale Law School, he joined his father’s law firm in Washington, DC, which specialized in copyright, trademark, and entertainment law. He continued there until 1999, when he retired. Over the years, Brylawski has served on numerous boards and committees related to the law and written more than a dozen law review articles. He also held numerous civic positions and was involved in several professional organizations, including the Copyright Society of America and the advisory committee to the U.S. Register of Copyrights.

As a young man, Brylawski won several amateur golf championships. He still enjoys the sport. He and his wife, Barbara, have been married for 10 years.

“I expect the Institute’s new cancer center to play an important role in winning the fight against cancer,” he says. “I am pleased to make a gift to further that purpose.”

For giving information, contact Judy Sager:

(617) 253-6463; jsager@mit.edu.

Or visit giving.mit.edu.

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