Skip to Content
Uncategorized

News, Entertainment, Digital Life Coming Together

Media companies continue to cling tightly to their copyrights, but ever so slowly, users are being invited to play.
November 2, 2006

With television ratings stagnating, news organizations are searching for new ways to nab viewers–particularly younger viewers who turn to the Web for their information. The Big Three–ABC, NBC, and CBS–are making a concerted effort to develop a Web presence. ABC, though, is by far the most forward thinking. It’s creating a 15-minute Web-only broadcast, according to this Hollywood Reporter piece.

What makes this interesting is the fact that ABC has eschewed traditional thinking. The organization doesn’t simply place its television broadcasts online. Instead, it’s working to engage the digital audience.

Now, not to get all Cluetrain Manifesto-y on you, but ABC is going about this the right way. It sees the Web as simply a platform for conversation. One-to-many broadcasts, such as television, are good for one medium, but they’re not good for developing a large-scale audience online. From the Hollywood Reporter:

Some of the pieces have a decidedly new-media feel to them. A correspondent recently shot a piece walking on the streets of Baghdad to explain what it was like to wait in line for gasoline and pay more than Iraqis are accustomed to paying. It was closer to a video blog entry than a traditional report.

Of course, it’s not all fun and entertainment on the Web. Viacom has requested that Google’s YouTube remove all copyrighted materials–including clips from The Daily Show and The Colbert Report–from its site, ostensibly to make way for a licensing agreement that will allow the media giants to build solid business models around Web video. And MySpace, the market leader in social networking, which has partnered with various entertainment groups, announced that it would use “audio fingerprinting” technology to block the use of unauthorized music by its users.

Despite the restrictions, it’s become clear that media companies are trying to walk a fine line between building and engaging their audiences, and also protecting their copyrighted material.

Nowhere are these two issues coming to a head more starkly than in the grand experiment in Second Life, a virtual world that has seen a dramatic rise in its user base and a dramatic rise in the number of corporations rushing to set up virtual shops.

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Five poems about the mind

DREAM VENDING MACHINE I feed it coins and watch the spring coil back,the clunk of a vacuum-packed, foil-wrappeddream dropping into the tray. It dispenses all kinds of dreams—bad dreams, good dreams,short nightmares to stave off worse ones, recurring dreams with a teacake marshmallow center.Hardboiled caramel dreams to tuck in your cheek,a bag of orange dreams…

Work reinvented: Tech will drive the office evolution

As organizations navigate a new world of hybrid work, tech innovation will be crucial for employee connection and collaboration.

lucid dreaming concept
lucid dreaming concept

I taught myself to lucid dream. You can too.

We still don’t know much about the experience of being aware that you’re dreaming—but a few researchers think it could help us find out more about how the brain works.

panpsychism concept
panpsychism concept

Is everything in the world a little bit conscious?

The idea that consciousness is widespread is attractive to many for intellectual and, perhaps, also emotional
reasons. But can it be tested? Surprisingly, perhaps it can.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.