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Hack: How to Steal an Election

Princeton University computer scientists expose the weakness of a diebold voting machine.
November 1, 2006

This September, researchers from Princeton University’s Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP), led by Edward Felten, released a damning paper and accompanying video that showed how easily they were able to rig a mock election by loading a virus of their design onto a Diebold ­AccuVote-TS, one of the most commonly used electronic voting machines in the United States.

Click here for our description of Princeton’s hack on the Diebold-AccuVote-TS.

Read David Talbot’s article, “Will Your Vote Count?”, to find out more about growing concerns over possible breakdowns, voter confusion, and fraud.

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