Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Choosing Mobile TV Channels

Want to watch ESPN on your cell phone? Then you’d better be a Verizon subscriber. TR helps you navigate the new universe of mobile TV services.
January 9, 2006

[Click here for Technology Review’s interactive graphic on mobile TV services.]

TV delivered to your cell phone: It’s a long-promised innovation that is finally seeing daylight. For consumers, it’s bringing the opportunity to watch familiar channels like Fox News, E!, and Disney on the go, perhaps while they’re waiting in line for a latte or riding the bus to work. For cellular carriers, it offers the chance to charge customers an additional $10 to $15 per month for basic video service, plus extra fees for pay-per-view shows or a la carte channels. And for the networks, which get a big slice of those fees, mobile TV offers a potential source of revenue at a time when many advertisers are losing interest in traditional broadcast TV advertising.

In fact, cellular carriers, broadcast networks, and software makers see mobile TV as a potential gold mine, and are rushing to form alliances and create channel lineups that will appeal to cell-phone owners. (For the full story on this competition, see our recent report ”The Small Screen,” which also appears in the December 2005/January 2006 issue of Technology Review.)

At the moment, consumers trying to choose a mobile TV provider have no way to directly compare the various content packages on offer. So we’ve developed an interactive information graphic to help people shopping for cellular service navigate the increasing tangle of tiny-screen TV options. As you’ll see, the mobile TV services you prefer – CBS, CNN, Univision, Comedy Channel, etc. – might just help determine which cell-phone carrier you pick.

Information graphic by Tommy McCall
Flash programming by Geoff Allman

Keep Reading

Most Popular

individual aging affects covid outcomes concept
individual aging affects covid outcomes concept

Anti-aging drugs are being tested as a way to treat covid

Drugs that rejuvenate our immune systems and make us biologically younger could help protect us from the disease’s worst effects.

Europe's AI Act concept
Europe's AI Act concept

A quick guide to the most important AI law you’ve never heard of

The European Union is planning new legislation aimed at curbing the worst harms associated with artificial intelligence.

Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot
Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot

It will soon be easy for self-driving cars to hide in plain sight. We shouldn’t let them.

If they ever hit our roads for real, other drivers need to know exactly what they are.

crypto winter concept
crypto winter concept

Crypto is weathering a bitter storm. Some still hold on for dear life.

When a cryptocurrency’s value is theoretical, what happens if people quit believing?

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.