Skip to Content
Uncategorized

A Letter to Our Subscribers

December 15, 2005

Dear subscriber,

Technology Review was founded in 1899 and is published by Technology Review Inc., an independent enterprise owned by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. For the better part of a century, our mission has been to describe emerging technologies and analyze their commercial, economic, social, and political impact for an audience of senior executives, researchers, financiers, policymakers, and MIT alumni.

That won’t change. But our print magazine and our website will be changing. This letter is to advise you, a valued customer, of those changes.

The publishing industry is experiencing an extraordinary alteration. Readers, and the advertisers who have for years subsidized the creation of editorial products, are spending more and more time and money on the Web. Readers want information to be immediate, searchable, and easily customized, and advertisers are demanding accountability from the publishers who take their money. Put baldly, the era when publishers could rely on print magazines to satisfy their readers and build sustainable businesses is over.

In keeping with MIT’s history of innovation and leadership, Technology Review has decided to invest more of its resources in interactive media. We do not believe, as some have opined, that “print is dead”; there are many things that print magazines do better than more interactive media. But we are sure that we must offer our readers and advertisers more products and choices online.

We are also convinced that our readers look to us for intelligent analysis of the impact of emerging technologies, and that when we stray from that mission we disappoint you.We will therefore:

•? Decrease the frequency of the print magazine to bimonthly publication;

•? Focus the print magazine on what print does best: present longer-format, investigative stories and colorful imagery;

•? Dramatically increase the number of stories we publish on technologyreview.com every day;

•? Expand the range of media we employ online to include podcasts, blogs, RSS feeds, and a variety of new technologies;

•? Focus all our editorial content on the impact of emerging technologies and discontinue our coverage of the business models and financing of new technologies.

In making these changes, we were mainly guided by you, our readers. We have followed with great excitement the increased traffic on technologyreview.com. And recent research revealed that fully 92 percent of you valued our coverage of emerging technologies, but as few as 34 percent liked our stories about technology finance and business models.

As a subscriber to the print magazine, you will receive the same number of issues; the length of your subscription will double. You will receive an issue every other month. Your next issue will be mailed in early February. In 2006 you will receive issues in March, May, July, September, and November. In 2007 you will receive issues in January, March, May, July, September, and November.

You will also have access to our premium content online, including our magazine archives.

Finally, I would urge you all to visit technologyreview.com, and experience in new media the same intelligent, analytical, groundbreaking editorial content you like in Technology Review magazine.

Yours sincerely,

Jason Pontin
Editor-in-chief and publisher
Technology Review

Deep Dive

Uncategorized

Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot
Uber Autonomous Vehicles parked in a lot

It will soon be easy for self-driving cars to hide in plain sight. We shouldn’t let them.

If they ever hit our roads for real, other drivers need to know exactly what they are.

stock art of market data
stock art of market data

Maximize business value with data-driven strategies

Every organization is now collecting data, but few are truly data driven. Here are five ways data can transform your business.

Cryptocurrency fuels new business opportunities

As adoption of digital assets accelerates, companies are investing in innovative products and services.

Yann LeCun
Yann LeCun

Yann LeCun has a bold new vision for the future of AI

One of the godfathers of deep learning pulls together old ideas to sketch out a fresh path for AI, but raises as many questions as he answers.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose WongIllustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.