Skip to Content
Uncategorized

Misguided NASA Priorities

Bush’s ill-conceived moon-Mars initiative continues to force its way through the scientific community, taking down worthwhile scientific projects as it goes.Ignoring recent scientific history that shows that robotic missions produce more bang for the buck, NASA most likely plans to…
March 11, 2005

Bush’s ill-conceived moon-Mars initiative continues to force its way through the scientific community, taking down worthwhile scientific projects as it goes.

Ignoring recent scientific history that shows that robotic missions produce more bang for the buck, NASA most likely plans to abandon the Hubble Space Telescope, terminate the Voyager 1 and 2 missions (as well as six others), and now looks to lay off 15 percent of its full-time workforce.

Bush still hasn’t elucidated a clear reason for going to the Moon and Mars, and he certainly doesn’t seem very enthusiastic about it. Meanwhile, good science is on the chopping block, and there’s no evidence the Administration really cares.

Keep Reading

Most Popular

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Every year, we look for promising technologies poised to have a real impact on the world. Here are the advances that we think matter most right now.

The worst technology failures of 2023

The Titan submersible, lab-grown chicken, and GM’s wayward Cruise robotaxis made our annual list of the worst in tech.

AI for everything: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Generative AI tools like ChatGPT reached mass adoption in record time, and reset the course of an entire industry.

Scientists are finding signals of long covid in blood. They could lead to new treatments.

Faults in a certain part of the immune system might be at the root of some long covid cases, new research suggests.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.