Skip to Content

Wireless Triple Play

One of the biggest obstacles to boosting transmission speed on wireless data networks is the interference caused by buildings. In cities, signals become so scattered that cellular base station antennas often struggle to gather in a complete signal, thus reducing overall performance. Rather than try to overpower the interference problem, Michael Andrews and his team of researchers at Lucent Technologies’ Bell Labs decided to embrace it with an ingenious triple antenna that thrives in a chaotic city environment. The new antenna promises to deliver six times the capacity of today’s single-antenna networks and triple that of experimental dual-antenna systems. The technology, which also requires that cell phones include a three-pronged antenna, exploits the fact that radio signals bouncing off buildings arrive at a receiver in different orientations. Each orientation has an electrical and magnetic component, and each of these could be made to carry different information. Wireless equipment vendors are now evaluating the technology for potential use in commercial products. -E. Brown

Keep Reading

Most Popular

10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Every year, we look for promising technologies poised to have a real impact on the world. Here are the advances that we think matter most right now.

Scientists are finding signals of long covid in blood. They could lead to new treatments.

Faults in a certain part of the immune system might be at the root of some long covid cases, new research suggests.

AI for everything: 10 Breakthrough Technologies 2024

Generative AI tools like ChatGPT reached mass adoption in record time, and reset the course of an entire industry.

OpenAI teases an amazing new generative video model called Sora

The firm is sharing Sora with a small group of safety testers but the rest of us will have to wait to learn more.

Stay connected

Illustration by Rose Wong

Get the latest updates from
MIT Technology Review

Discover special offers, top stories, upcoming events, and more.

Thank you for submitting your email!

Explore more newsletters

It looks like something went wrong.

We’re having trouble saving your preferences. Try refreshing this page and updating them one more time. If you continue to get this message, reach out to us at customer-service@technologyreview.com with a list of newsletters you’d like to receive.