Hello,

We noticed you're browsing in private or incognito mode.

To continue reading this article, please exit incognito mode or log in.

Not an Insider? Subscribe now for unlimited access to online articles.

The Real McCoys

Third sister to become an MIT alumna and U.S. Navy officer is one of 12 MIT ROTC grads sworn in aboard Old Ironsides in June.

  • August 16, 2017

On June 9, hours after receiving her diploma in mechanical engineering in Killian Court, Colleen McCoy ’17 stood at attention on the deck of the USS Constitution as her sisters Bridget ’15 (left) and Fiona ’13 pinned her ensign shoulder boards to her uniform. She then returned her first salute as a U.S. Navy officer to Shannon McCoy ’19, the fourth McCoy sister to take part in MIT’s Reserve Officer Training Corps. Fiona is a Navy lieutenant and Bridget a lieutenant junior grade.

Colleen was one of 12 MIT ROTC graduates who took their oaths of service in the Air Force, Army, or Navy that day. “We need people who think critically and can bring clarity in crisis,” Darren W. McDew, a four-star general in the Air Force, told the new officers. “Don’t be afraid to be bold. Lead. Don’t shy away from it. Just lead.” More than 12,000 officers have been commissioned from MIT since its ROTC program began in 1865; over 150 have gone on to become admirals or generals.

In July, Ensign McCoy reported for duty at the Navy Yard in Washington, where she will serve as a naval reactor engineer. 

Tech Obsessive?
Become an Insider to get the story behind the story — and before anyone else.

Subscribe today

Uh oh–you've read all of your free articles for this month.

Insider Premium
$179.95/yr US PRICE

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe to Insider Plus.
  • Insider Plus {! insider.prices.plus !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Everything included in Insider Basic, plus ad-free web experience, select discounts to partner offerings and MIT Technology Review events

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly magazine delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website

    The Download: our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation

    Access to the magazine PDF archive—thousands of articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips

    Special discounts to select partner offerings

    Discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Ad-free web experience

/
You've read all of your free articles this month. This is your last free article this month. You've read of free articles this month. or  for unlimited online access.