Hello,

We noticed you're browsing in private or incognito mode.

To continue reading this article, please exit incognito mode or log in.

Not a subscriber? Subscribe now for unlimited access to online articles.

Intelligent Machines

Rethink’s Sawyer Robot Just Got a Whole Lot Smarter

The company that makes robots meant to collaborate with people has just added a ton of features in a big software upgrade.

Rethink Robotics, pioneers in the field of collaborative industrial robotics, has made a massive upgrade to its Sawyer robots. Designed to help non-experts program routines that instruct the robot how to carry out complex tasks, the new Intera 5 software could help the company realize the potential of factory robots that are capable, safe, and easy to work with.

At the heart of the new system is what Rethink’s founder and CTO Rodney Brooks calls the “behavior engine.” This is essentially a programmable decision tree that can be tweaked to make the single-armed Sawyer robot carry out a wide array of tasks.

As IEEE Spectrum reports, previous versions of Intera kept large chunks of a robot’s decision tree hidden from users. Intera 5, on the other hand, uses a graphical interface to show users exactly why Sawyer is behaving the way it is, step by step. It also allows them to make any changes they like—either by directly programming new steps, or by using the robot’s impressive teach-by-demonstration feature to guide its arm and tools in the right sequence.

Rethink’s first robot, a two-armed model called Baxter, didn’t sell very well—but it was a proof of principle that robots could use things like force sensors to avoid hurting humans while still performing useful industrial tasks. It’s also been a hit in the research community, leading to all kinds of neat ways to teach robots new tasks.

With Sawyer, Brooks built a smaller, faster, and more precise robot that he says is proving much more popular. Whether Intera 5 proves to be the killer app for turning Sawyer into an indispensable, user-friendly factory worker, however, remains to be seen.

(Read more: IEEE Spectrum, “How Robots Can Quickly Teach Each Other to Grasp New Objects,” “Rethinking the Manufacturing Robot”)

Keep up with the latest in intelligent machines at EmTech Digital.

The Countdown has begun.
March 25-26, 2019
San Francisco, CA

Register now
More from Intelligent Machines

Artificial intelligence and robots are transforming how we work and live.

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe to Print + All Access Digital.
  • Print + All Access Digital {! insider.prices.print_digital !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    The best of MIT Technology Review in print and online, plus unlimited access to our online archive, an ad-free web experience, discounts to MIT Technology Review events, and The Download delivered to your email in-box each weekday.

    See details+

    12-month subscription

    Unlimited access to all our daily online news and feature stories

    6 bi-monthly issues of print + digital magazine

    10% discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Access to entire PDF magazine archive dating back to 1899

    Ad-free website experience

    The Download: newsletter delivery each weekday to your inbox

    The MIT Technology Review App

/3
You've read of three free articles this month. for unlimited online access. You've read of three free articles this month. for unlimited online access. This is your last free article this month. for unlimited online access. You've read all your free articles this month. for unlimited online access. You've read of three free articles this month. for more, or for unlimited online access. for two more free articles, or for unlimited online access.