A View from MIT TR Editors

Recommended from Around the Web (Week Ending February 21, 2014)

A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.

  • February 20, 2014

Elevating Crop Disease Resistance with Cloned Genes
Why GM blight-resistant potatoes could be important.
David Rotman, editor

California’s Auto-Emissions Policy Hits a Tesla Pothole
A look at the “morass of expensive and unwanted consequences” stemming from automobile emissions regulations.
Kevin Bullis, senior editor, energy

Slide Show: Power Hungry
Some great pictures showing the impact of energy projects.
—Kevin Bullis

Are Quizzes the New Lists? What BuzzFeed’s Latest Viral Success Means for Publishing.
The Nieman Journalism Lab goes behind the scenes at BuzzFeed to learn the motivation behind the site’s new emphasis on quizzes. It’s all about sharing.
Mike Orcutt, research editor

Silk Road 2.0 Hacked with Over £1.6m Worth of Bitcoin ‘Stolen’
Order Up! Food Businesses Find an Appetite for Bitcoin

I can’t help but be completely fascinated yet totally freaked out by Bitcoins …
—J. Juniper Friedman, editorial assistant

‘Candy Crush’ Is Bigger than Twitter, but Probably Not for Long
“Candy Crush, which launched less than two years ago, generated more than $450 million in revenue in the December quarter, nearly double the revenue that 8-year-old Twitter generated in the same period.”
—Kyanna Sutton, senior Web producer

Wireless System Could Offer a Private Fast Lane
An intriguing-sounding wireless technology that a creditable founder claims will revolutionize the mobile Internet.
Will Knight, news and analysis editor

Forget Its Hotels, Sochi’s Tech Has Been Up for the Olympic Challenge
A very revealing look at how a modern surveillance state used technology to do things like watch journalists and maintain security during the games in Sochi, Russia.
David Talbot, chief correspondent

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