Hello,

We noticed you're browsing in private or incognito mode.

To continue reading this article, please exit incognito mode or log in.

Not an Insider? Subscribe now for unlimited access to online articles.

Jessica Leber

A View from Jessica Leber

Windows 8 Isn’t Looking Like Microsoft’s Savior Yet

In its first earning report since key product launches, Microsoft’s results are just so-so.

  • January 24, 2013

Reporting record revenues of $22 billion, Microsoft painted a rosy picture today in its first earnings report to include sales related to its Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 software, as well as its new Surface tablets. 

These products launched in October and early November, and as PC sales slump, Microsoft is banking on them to gain ground in the all-important smartphone and tablet market, where the company is only a minor player today. 

In Microsoft’s Windows division, sales were $5.8 billion, a 24 percent increase from the same period a year ago. Microsoft sold 60 million Windows 8 licenses to date, it said.

In general, these figures seem pretty good, but, as CNNMoney points out, fiscal quarters that included previous Windows launches were even bigger: After the Windows 7 launch, sales grew 76 percent, and after Windows Vista, sales grew 65 percent. That suggests businesses and individuals may be less enthusiastic than in the past about upgrading to Microsoft’s completely overhauled operating system that has a user interface optimized for touchscreen tablets and PCs. Though to be fair, overall new PC sales have also declined. Microsoft CFO Peter Klein said that 60 percent of business desktops worldwide run on Windows 7, however, so 60 million Windows 8 licenses doesn’t seem like that massive a number.

What could also potentially be a bad omen: In Microsoft’s Entertainment and Devices division, which includes Windows Phone 8, Surface, Skype and Xbox, revenue dropped by 11 percent compared to a year ago. Microsoft did not disclose how many Surface tablets it has sold. For phones that run on Windows software, manufacturers are selling four times more devices than a year ago, Microsoft said, but again, without knowing the baseline numbers, that could really mean anything. Executives empasized that these products are still in their early days. 

Microsoft’s expenses grew by 10 percent, Klein said, mostly related to marketing spending for the new product launches. In San Francisco, at least, it’s been hard to walk a few blocks downtown without bumping into another Microsoft ad.

Tech Obsessive?
Become an Insider to get the story behind the story — and before anyone else.

Subscribe today

Uh oh–you've read all of your free articles for this month.

Insider Premium
$179.95/yr US PRICE

More from Business Impact

How technology advances are changing the economy and providing new opportunities in many industries.

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe and become an Insider.
  • Insider Premium {! insider.prices.premium !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Our award winning magazine, unlimited access to our story archive, special discounts to MIT Technology Review Events, and exclusive content.

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly magazine delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website

    The Download: our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation

    Access to the magazine PDF archive—thousands of articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips

    Special discounts to select partner offerings

    Discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Ad-free web experience

    First Look: exclusive early access to important stories, before they’re available to anyone else

    Insider Conversations: listen in on in-depth calls between our editors and today’s thought leaders

  • Insider Plus {! insider.prices.plus !}* Best Value

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Everything included in Insider Basic, plus ad-free web experience, select discounts to partner offerings and MIT Technology Review events

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly magazine delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website

    The Download: our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation

    Access to the magazine PDF archive—thousands of articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips

    Special discounts to select partner offerings

    Discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Ad-free web experience

  • Insider Basic {! insider.prices.basic !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Six issues of our award winning magazine and daily delivery of The Download, our newsletter of what’s important in technology and innovation.

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly magazine delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website

    The Download: our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation

/
You've read all of your free articles this month. This is your last free article this month. You've read of free articles this month. or  for unlimited online access.