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Helping Hands

This robotic rehabilitation device from Northeastern University uses electrically responsive fluid in its gears to adjust resistance as a patient performs gripping exercises. A patient who is recovering from a stroke, for example, could use the device to strengthen motor control as she plays a maze game.

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