A View from Erica Naone

Calling for Shows

Foneshow uses “dumb phones” to change radio.

  • April 8, 2008

Foneshow, one of the companies that demonstrated today at Venture Summit East in Boston, is using the low technology in many people’s pockets to challenge the radio industry. Foneshow allows people to listen to radio programs by calling a number from their cell phones. Text messages let them know when new shows are available. The technology is simple, since the show is going out over the same voice channel used for a regular phone call. Foneshow identifies the numbers calling to hear a show and uses that information to save a listener’s place in case the listener has to hang up and call back later. The company makes money by including advertising in the notification text messages, and by sharing revenue from interactive ads inside the radio programs with the programs’ producers.

I tried out Foneshow, and was taken by its simplicity. So many things are being designed for iPhones and other high-end mobile devices, yet I’m always interested by companies that aim for the “dumb phones” that are carried by far more people. In addition to indie shows, Foneshow includes content from the likes of NPR and the New York Times.

In today’s presentation, CEO Erik Schwartz described Foneshow as one effort to adapt radio to coming changes in the market. Like the newspaper industry, he said, radio is having difficulty measuring the effects of advertising, which is undermining its business model. Schwartz, however, is confident in the face of the radio industry’s anxiety. “There’s nothing I like better than a 20-billion-dollar-a-year industry that thinks it’s doomed,” he said.

Cut off? Read unlimited articles today.

Become an Insider
Already an Insider? Log in.

Uh oh–you've read all of your free articles for this month.

Insider Premium
$179.95/yr US PRICE

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe and become an Insider.
  • Insider Premium {! insider.prices.premium !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Our award winning magazine, unlimited access to our story archive, special discounts to MIT Technology Review Events, and exclusive content.

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly home delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website.

    The Download. Our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation.

    Access to the Magazine archive. Over 24,000 articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips.

    Special Discounts to select partner offerings

    Discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Ad-free web experience

    First Look. Exclusive early access to stories.

    Insider Conversations. Listen in as our editors talk to innovators from around the world.

  • Insider Plus {! insider.prices.plus !}* Best Value

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Everything included in Insider Basic, plus ad-free web experience, select discounts to partner offerings and MIT Technology Review events

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly home delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website.

    The Download. Our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation.

    Access to the Magazine archive. Over 24,000 articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips.

    Special Discounts to select partner offerings

    Discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Ad-free web experience

  • Insider Basic {! insider.prices.basic !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Six issues of our award winning magazine and daily delivery of The Download, our newsletter of what’s important in technology and innovation.

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly home delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website.

    The Download. Our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation.

/
You've read all of your free articles this month. This is your last free article this month. You've read of free articles this month. or  for unlimited online access.