How Windy is MIT?

To find out, students installed anemometers, wind direction sensors, and data loggers on seven MIT rooftops. “Our preliminary data indicates that most of MIT is not windy enough to make wind turbines economically viable,” says Dan Wesolowski (right), a PhD student in materials science and engineering, who collected data with ­Richard Bates ‘09 atop Building 36 in May. “However, the roof of Eastgate has enough sustained wind to produce power at rates as low as $0.10 per kilowatt-hour over its lifetime, significantly cheaper than MIT’s grid electric rate.” The students also found that Buildings 54 and W84 may be suitable for small-scale wind-capture projects.

Uh oh–you've read all of your free articles for this month.

Insider Premium
$179.95/yr US PRICE

Want more award-winning journalism? Subscribe to Insider Premium.
  • Insider Premium {! insider.prices.premium !}*

    {! insider.display.menuOptionsLabel !}

    Our award winning magazine, unlimited access to our story archive, special discounts to MIT Technology Review Events, and exclusive content.

    See details+

    What's Included

    Bimonthly home delivery and unlimited 24/7 access to MIT Technology Review’s website.

    The Download. Our daily newsletter of what's important in technology and innovation.

    Access to the Magazine archive. Over 24,000 articles going back to 1899 at your fingertips.

    Special Discounts to select partner offerings

    Discount to MIT Technology Review events

    Ad-free web experience

    First Look. Exclusive early access to stories.

    Insider Conversations. Listen in as our editors talk to innovators from around the world.

/
You've read all of your free articles this month. This is your last free article this month. You've read of free articles this month. or  for unlimited online access.