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MIT Technology Review

The End of Moore’s Law?

May 2000

The current economic boom is likely due to increases in computing speed and decreases in price. Now there are some good reasons to think that the party may be ending.

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Letter from the editor

Features

  • Categorized in 17032

    Molecular Computing

    Imagine computers orders of magnitude more powerful and far cheaper than today’s machines. That’s one promise of a field that uses individual molecules as microscopic switches.

  • Categorized in 17032

    Quantum Computing

    Computers that tap the bizarre properties of subatomic particles might calculate with awesome speed-cracking codes that stymie conventional machines.

  • Categorized in 17032

    Biological Computing

    A vial of bacteria capable of computation? Injectable cells that survey the bloodstream and produce drugs on demand? These ideas might not be as far-fetched as they sound.

  • Categorized in 17035

    DNA Computing

    DNA-based PCs? Doubtful. But DNA might do some computing-while assembling nanostructures.

  • Categorized in 17036

    The Corporate Logic

    Alternatives to silicon-based computing are long shots. Knowing that, why do HP, Lucent and IBM spend time and money pursuing them? Their reasons may surprise you.

  • Categorized in 17032

    Wake Up Call for HP

    She’s baaaack. Carly Fiorina, a former Hewlett-Packard temp, has returned to jolt the information technology giant out of its lethargy. Her goal is simple: Make the company “unbeatable” in the coming age of pervasive computing.

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