Skip to Content

Hacking climate change

September/October 2022

MIT is all about making the world a better place. This special report on the Climate Grand Challenges initiative looks at how the Institute’s problem solvers are stepping up to help save the planet from the devastating effects of global warming.

Read the issue

Features

  • Categorized in MIT News: Cover story

    Hacking climate change

    MIT is all about making the world a better place. This special report on the Climate Grand Challenges initiative looks at how the Institute’s problem solvers are stepping up to help save the planet from the devastating effects of global warming.

  • Categorized in MIT Climate Grand Challenge

    Sounding the alarm, bolstering defenses

    An early warning system to help mitigate the impact of climate disasters in the world’s most vulnerable regions.

  • Categorized in MIT Climate Grand Challenge

    Going after the big four

    An ambitious project with the potential to slash nearly half of industrial carbon emissions.

  • Categorized in MIT Climate Grand Challenge

    Predicting—and preparing for—the worst

    Climate change is making extreme weather events more frequent and intense. So improving local risk prediction—and studying how extreme weather could affect renewable energy systems—will be critical to building resilience into vulnerable communities and the growing green energy sector.

  • Categorized in MIT Climate Grand Challenge

    Making agriculture greener

    From self-fertilizing crops to more resilient seeds, these projects aim to boost yields and slash emissions.

  • Categorized in MIT Climate Grand Challenge

    Building a weather app for climate change

    This project aims to get accurate local climate information into the hands of those who must ready their communities for wilder weather.

  • Categorized in MIT News: Feature story

    Frozen

    Grad student Joanna Millstein is tackling big questions about glacier dynamics that will help us understand how the changing—and in some cases disappearing—ice sheets will affect the planet.

  • Categorized in MIT News: Feature story

    Cleaning up

    Inspired by cell membranes and Kevlar vests, Ty Christoff-Tempesta, PhD ’22, invented a nanomaterial that can be used to clean contaminated water and create recyclable plastics.

  • Categorized in MIT News - Seen on campus

    Sponge art

    An MIT student turns Simmons Hall into the canvas for an interactive, audio-driven art exhibit.

  • Categorized in MIT News: 77 Mass Ave

    Sugar rush

    An ultrathin fuel cell uses the body’s own glucose to generate electricity that could power implantable devices.

  • Categorized in MIT News: 77 Mass Ave

    Robo-fireflies

    Insect-size robots light up to enable motion tracking and communication.

  • Categorized in MIT News: 77 Mass Ave

    Race-detecting AI

    Researchers trained an algorithm to identify people’s self-reported race from medical images, but they are mystified as to how it works.

  • Categorized in MIT News: 77 Mass Ave

    Learning to hear

    Only a few types of sound reach babies in the womb, but that may help them learn to process auditory input as they grow.

  • Categorized in MIT News: 77 Mass Ave

    Galactic neighbors

    A newly discovered planetary system just 33 light-years away appears to include two rocky, Earth-size bodies.

  • Have an idea for a great MIT story?


    If you know of any MIT alumni making a difference in their corner of the planet, let us know. We always welcome your ideas for interesting stories about the MIT community.

    Share your stories

Past issues

    Updated