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Large language models can do jaw-dropping things. But nobody knows exactly why.

And that's a problem. Figuring it out is one of the biggest scientific puzzles of our time and a crucial step towards controlling more powerful future models.

The problem with plug-in hybrids? Their drivers.

Plug-in hybrids are often sold as a transition to EVs, but new data from Europe shows we’re still underestimating the emissions they produce.

How scientists traced a mysterious covid case back to six toilets

When wastewater surveillance turns into a hunt for a single infected individual, the ethics get tricky.

Google DeepMind’s new generative model makes Super Mario–like games from scratch

Genie learns how to control games by watching hours and hours of video. It could help train next-gen robots too.

What’s next for generative video

OpenAI's Sora has raised the bar for AI moviemaking. Here are four things to bear in mind as we wrap our heads around what's coming.

An AI-driven “factory of drugs” claims to have hit a big milestone

Insilico is part of a wave of companies betting on AI as the "next amazing revolution" in biology

Is robotics about to have its own ChatGPT moment?

Researchers are using generative AI and other techniques to teach robots new skills—including tasks they could perform in homes.

Harvard has halted its long-planned atmospheric geoengineering experiment

The decision follows years of controversy and the departure of one of the program’s key researchers.

Collection

MIT Technology Review’s What’s Next series looks across industries, trends, and technologies to give you a first look at the future.

What’s next for generative video

OpenAI's Sora has raised the bar for AI moviemaking. Here are four things to bear in mind as we wrap our heads around what's coming.

What’s next for offshore wind

New projects and financial headwinds will make 2024 a bumpy year for the industry.

What’s next for robotaxis in 2024

In addition to restoring public trust, robotaxi companies need to prove that their business models can compete with Uber and taxis.

What’s next for AI in 2024

Our writers look at the four hot trends to watch out for this year

What’s next for AI regulation in 2024? 

The coming year is going to see the first sweeping AI laws enter into force, with global efforts to hold tech companies accountable. 

What’s next for the world’s fastest supercomputers

Scientists have begun running experiments on Frontier, the world’s first official exascale machine, while facilities worldwide build other machines to join the ranks.

What’s next for China’s digital currency?

China’s government has struggled to find uses for e-CNY inside of China. Now, it's hoping to use it to challenge the US-dominated international financial system.

What’s next for the moon

Robots—and then humans—are going back to the lunar surface. Here’s what they’ll be doing.

Magazine

Our new issue!
March/April 2024

The Hidden Worlds issue

Using technology to explore and expose hidden worlds, from enabling deeper dives into ocean depths to journeying to one of Jupiter’s orbiting bodies to pushing the boundaries of particle physics. Plus: wearables for wildlife, Wi-Fi sensing, and a reconsideration of Luddites.

Inside the hunt for new physics at the world’s largest particle collider

The Large Hadron Collider hasn’t seen any new particles since the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. Here’s what researchers are trying to do about it.

The search for extraterrestrial life is targeting Jupiter’s icy moon Europa

NASA’s Europa Clipper mission will travel to one of Jupiter's largest moons to look for evidence of conditions that could support life.

How tracking animal movement may save the planet

Researchers have been dreaming of an Internet of Animals. They’re getting closer to monitoring 100,000 creatures—and revealing hidden facets of our shared world.

Sponsored

Generative AI: Differentiating disruptors from the disrupted

Many enterprises aiming to disrupt their industries with generative AI underestimate the requirements for effective deployment of the technology.

In partnership withTelstra International

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All the latest from MIT News, the alumni magazine of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Tackling long-haul diseases

Long-haul covid and chronic Lyme disease are surprisingly similar. MIT immunoengineer Mikki Tal is on the case.

Divine economics

For Allison V. Thompkins, PhD ’11, economics and spirituality are complementary pursuits, shaped by an expansive understanding of disability.

I’m a beaver.
You’re a beaver.
We are beavers all.

Amazing facts about MIT’s ingenious mascot.

Tapping into MIT’s strengths

The Institute’s superpower is its ability to make the world better. We’re harnessing that now to improve both the world and MIT.

Illuminating the life of a cell

By tagging molecules in a cell with fluorescent labels that switch on and off, MIT engineers can study their interaction to learn more about how cells operate.

Engineering defense, with the help of butterflies

Phillip Daniel ’13, SM ’15, PhD ’22

New insights on political polarization

Media might deepen partisan divides, but we should measure reading habits more carefully before drawing conclusions—and avoid assuming that our own thought processes are the only rational ones.

What’s blue to you

Amazonian people whose language lacks separate words for blue and green began interpreting colors in a new way when they learned Spanish.

How Technology Review got its start

Tech Review has graced coffee tables of MIT alumni for 125 years. Here’s how it all began—and how the fledgling magazine helped rally alumni to oppose a merger with Harvard.

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