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5G will change how we think about communication

Experts from Telstra and MIT discuss how the intersection of 5G, AI, and IoT technologies will transform the way we do business.

March 14, 2022

In partnership withInfosys

Every decade or so, we achieve a new generation of communication technology. Many of us remember 2G phones and about 10 years later 3G, then 4G. Now, we are watching the rollout of 5G, which is going to usher in a paradigm shift in the way we use and think about communication technology at both the consumer and enterprise levels.

The pandemic has made it clear that communications need to be full-blown utilities—always on, reliable, and fast. Our communication and network technologies need to be seamless, much like we expect power in our homes and businesses without interacting with the electric meter. 5G networks, together with cloud, IoT, and AI technologies, will facilitate the seamless, service-defined experiences enterprise and industry will need to succeed.

MIT Technology Review recently sat down with experts from Telstra and MIT— Kim Krogh Andersen, group executive at Telstra, and Muriel Medard, an IEEE fellow and the Cecil H. Green professor with Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at MIT—to discuss the enterprise transformation emerging at the intersection of 5G, AI, and IoT in the cloud.

Watch the webcast.

This content was produced by Insights, the custom content arm of MIT Technology Review. It was not written by MIT Technology Review’s editorial staff.

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